The Sailbuoy plays with Whales

Scientists at CMR last week ended up playing with whales in the sea outside Tromsø, near Vengsøy. Their target was fish finding with an echosounder equipped Sailbuoy, but whales also like fish and they got company.

22.01.2016 by Gunn Janne Myrseth

The Sailbuoy plays with Whales

-  Great experience. The Sailbuoy with echosounder and CMR software for data processing gave good results, and the whales luckily stayed away from the Sailbuoy, says Rune Hauge and Tom Kjøde, both CMR.

Meeting the whales was really a lifetime experience for both of them.

Cost effective solution

Testing of this system is an important step in the development of a cost effective solution for fish finding for the pelagic fisheries. This trip is taken as a result of the project "Fish finding with autonomous surface vehicles", a project financed by FHF - The Norwegian Seafood Research Fund - the Norwegian seafood industry’s tool in managing the industry’s investments into research.

- The goal of this project is to test the autonomous surface vehicle Sailbuoy for fish detection, and to further develop this into a system the pelagic fisheries can use for fish detection, says Hauge and explains the echograms:

-At first we see a school of herring seen in the crevice of Vengsøyleia, just north of Vengsøya. The school is located over the deepest areas of the crevice. The next echogram shows a school of herring in the deepest area of Vengsøyfjorden. The echogram is taken in the afternoon, and the herring have ascended from around 120 m up to around 40 m for feeding during the nighttime.

Different technologies can be put into the Sailbuoy for ocean observations. This time they only tested the Sailbuoy equipped with an echosounder to demonstrate that it could detect pelagic fish, which it did very well.

News coverage: “Fiskaren” follows the fishhunting

a school of herring seen in the crevice of Vengsøyleia, just north of Vengsøya. The school is located over the deepest areas of the crevice. 

 a school of herring in the deepest area of Vengsøyfjorden. The echogram is taken in the afternoon, and the herring have ascended from around 120 m up to around 40 m for feeding during the nighttime.

 

This photo coverage is taken by Tom Kjøde and Rune Hauge. Cop. Christian Michelsen Research. The map-tracking is given by OpenStreetMap on Garmin, shown at frikart. no.

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