UiB and CMR in high-tech collaboration

Last week students from UiB came to experiment with an ultra-high-speed camera on a mission to aid with troubleshooting the Field Kelvin Probe currently under development.

07.11.2016 by Gunn Janne Myrseth

UiB and CMR in high-tech collaboration

A steel plate corroding in salt water. Hydrogen produced in the corrosion process will diffuse through the plate. The FKP sensor placed under the free side of the plate detects the emerging hydrogen. Photo: CMR

Scientists at Christian Michelsen Research together with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute (Germany) are currently developing the Field Kelvin Probe to enable contactless detection of hidden corrosion in on- and off-shore installations.

The Field Kelvin Probe (FKP) is a new measuring instrument currently being developed at CMR, with funding from the Research Council of Norway as well as industrial funding. FKP technology will enable contactless detection of corrosion on bare or coated steel and even through thick metallic walls.

This complex project had help from Master students from UiB last week.  They were asked to help a CMR team to verify the integrity of FKP measurements by using high resolution high speed photography. A fine ultra-high-speed camera operated by the students allowed us to slow down the fast movement of a sensor in order to understand the problem.

We are looking forward to more mutually beneficial teamwork with UiB.

From laptop to FKP via ultra-speed camera. Photo: Gunn Janne Myrseth, Head of Communications CMR

Master students Wulme Puoru Dery and Michelle Magtuto Dagpin from UiB helps CMR scientists Inge Klepsvik, Bård Henriksen and Florin Turcu. Photo: Gunn Janne Myrseth, Head of Communications CMR